Cast: Bharath, Sunaina, Rajkiran, Ashish Vidhyarthi

Director and Music Director and lyrics: Perarasu

The film that has been in the backburner since 2008 is finally and hopefully [Because it’s not released yet] going to see the light of the day.

Although the movie has been in production since 2008 and the movie was made as long back as 2011, it was not released. It remains to be seen when the film will hit screens and what the public response will be. An interesting justification for this was given by SJ Suryah during the music launch: “ When Rama himself had a 14 year long hiatus away from the throne, then such a small gap(of 4 years) is OK for a director “.

The film has 2 songs shot in France with 3 folk songs, one melody and one song set in a Carnatic style. I’ll leave you guys to decide which songs were shot in France when the film finally releases.

The film’s music launch took place on the 19th of August, 2012 in Chennai.

Perarasu has donned too many hats in this movie what with composing songs and also penning lyrics for them and even lent his voice to a couple of songs. But would be able to do justice to it? Let’s see.

SONG NAME

PERFORMERS

RATING

Nee Enakku Nee Enakku

Karthik, Saindhavi

★★★☆☆

Vaanavedikkai Vedida

Tippu

★★★½☆

Adi Vaanaville

Chinmayi, Unni Menon

★★★★☆

Yamma Yamma

T Rajendhar, Anuradha Sriram

★★★½☆

Vannarapettai

Krishnaveni, Tippu, Perarasu

★★★☆☆

Raja Raja Chola

Perarasu

★★★☆☆

Nee Enakku Nee Enakku

Although the start of the number gives the impression of a slow melody number, the song actually proceeds at a faster pace. The lead singers, especially Saindhavi, have done a good job and their voices gel well as duet. The tune so too out dated except for wisps of modern tune at a few occasions in-between not to mention that it’s not unheard of and the lyrics seems something from a 90’s movie but it’s interesting to hear the words though. This is surely not a song for this millennium. You could hear it once but I doubt the youth of today would be tempted to hear it more than once.

Vaanavedikkai Vedida 

This one is a fast and peppy number set against a folk background. Tippu is supported by many chorus voices here and there. The first half again fails to sync with the times but the second half of the song makes up for it with some interesting tunes. Tippu’s voice gets us interested with the song and that is a good choice by Perarasu. I can actually picturize Bharath getting introduced with this song in the movie. It does suit! With some advices thrown in and a mention of a few of Perarasu’s earlier movies thrown in, the lyrics suit the peppy nature of the song and although it doesn’t stay in our lips, it makes for an interesting number. Enjoyable but not advised for repeated listening.

Adi Vaanaville 

The melodious start to the song seems to draw you in before the magical voice of Unni menon soothes you to no end. Chinmayi’s seems a bit out of place in the context of this song. Chitra or Nithyashree would have been a better choice. Unni’s voice more than makes up for this and the background instrumentals all add the touch of melody to the song. All you need to do is just sit back, close your eyes, relax and enjoy this number!! It’s that easy. The Carnatic musical base is ever so visible in this song. A must listen for people crazy about melody numbers. An interesting thing is that melody numbers usually fail to retain your attention till the end but this number varies its pace and introduces new tunes and keeps you hooked on till the very end with its peppy nature. If you are a Carnatic fan and are a good singer, then I can even see you humming the notes of this number. The lyrics complement the beauty of the song.

Yamma Yamma 

The song garners interest as and when you see T Rajendar’s name there. This is a typical Kuthu song which is so common in movies these days. Anuradha Sriram adds to genre of the song and complements T Rajendar in every sense with her energetic voice. The words grab you by the collar and make you listen to it. It is just so very interesting listening to the words. T Rajendar makes no mistake in keeping you engaged with song with interesting voices althrough the song. It’s interesting to see Perarasu use some typical melody instruments like the flute in a Kuthu song like this but it doesn’t seem out of place. The only drawback here is that I am not sure how successfully Rajendar’s voice would suit Bharat on screen. This is a mass entertainer and would make people listen to it on repeat.

Vannarapettai 

Another thumping song that would just provoke you shake a leg. The percussions are engagingly energetic. The lyric are interesting to hear to say the least and make use of a popular old song with the same lyric so as to draw the weightage of familiarity but the tune and instrumentals used seem so out dated and run-of-the-mill. Tippu draws you to the song but fails to provide energy to the song unlike his female counterpart, Krishnaveni. Tippu’s voice seems too mild for such a song but nevertheless, the keeps you engaged with the song till the very end and ensures that you keep listening to and singing it again and again. If only the tune was different, new and with today’s times, this would have been a firecracker.

Raja Raja Chola 

A fast number with some electronics put in! The words seem catchy and draw you to them. The use of saxophone could have been better since it seems out of place on most occasions and fails to make an impact. Perarasu’s voice is an interesting add to the song that has added the necessary thump and energy to the song. Although Perarasu endeavours to create something very modern with English sprinkled here and there, he fails terribly in understanding listener tastes. The lyrics are interesting to hear and enjoyable. I don’t think this would attract you towards it for more than twice.

Verdict: Except that lone Unni Menon song, all others seem run-of-the-mill and out-dated in terms of music.

Album ★★★★★★☆☆☆☆

This one is an overall disappointing show by Perarasu although he shines in parts. The good things are the lyrics which are enjoyable and make for a good listen and also the choice of singers in most of the songs who keep you engaged with the respective songs. But the album fails to gel with today’s times. It does not provide anything refreshingly different and innovatively new for the GEN-Y of today. The tunes all seem like you have heard them somewhere before. My guess is Perarasu just took something from here and some from there and made up the album. He has failed to capitalise despite having some commendable lyrics and some great singers in his side. This album may receive some attention in the rural and semi-urban parts but definitely not in the urban parts. Most of the songs in the earlier part of the album seem to have a touch of folk and traditional music to them with local instruments in extensive use but then Perarasu could have tried out a combination of western and traditional instruments and tunes. The movie appears to be a run-of-the-mill commercial masala mass entertainer that caters to hardcore Bharath fans and then some more in the rural and semi-urban parts.

Perarasu still has a long way to go when it comes to composing music although he seems to give some others in the industry a run for their money when it comes to penning lyrics.